Bureaucratic organizations

There is tight control over the day-to-day activities of the company, and change is slow to come, if it comes at all.

Bureaucratic organizations

Large international organisation bureaucratic structure: Precision, speed, unambiguity, … strict subordination, reduction of friction and of material and personal costs- these are raised to the optimum point in the strictly bureaucratic administration.

They are better suited for more complex or larger scale organizations, usually adopting a tall structure. The tension between bureaucratic structures and non-bureaucratic is echoed in Burns and Stalker's [10] distinction between mechanistic and organic structures.

The Weberian characteristics of bureaucracy are: Clear defined roles and responsibilities A hierarchical structure Respect for merit Bureaucratic structures have many levels of management ranging from senior executives to regional managers, all the way to department store managers.

Since there are many levels, decision-making authority has to pass through more layers than flatter organizations. A bureaucratic organization has rigid and tight procedures, policies and constraints. This kind of structure is reluctant to adapt or change what they have been doing since the company started.

Organizational charts exist for every department, and everyone understands who is in charge and what their responsibilities are for every situation.

Bureaucratic organizations

Decisions are made through an organizedaucratic structures, the authority is at the top and information is then flowed from top to bottom. This causes for more rules and standards for the company which operational process is watched with close supervision. Some advantages for bureaucratic structures for top-level managers are they have a tremendous control over organizational structure decisions.

This works best for managers who have a command and control style of managing. Strategic decision-making is also faster because there are fewer people it has to go through to approve. This can make it hard for a company to adapt to changing conditions in the marketplace. Post-bureaucratic[ edit ] The term of post bureaucratic is used in two senses in the organizational literature: This may include total quality managementculture management and matrix managementamongst others.

None of these however has left behind the core tenets of Bureaucracy. Hierarchies still exist, authority is still Weber's rational, legal type, and the organization is still rule bound. Heckscher, arguing along these lines, describes them as cleaned up bureaucracies, [12] rather than a fundamental shift away from bureaucracy.

Gideon Kunda, in his classic study of culture management at 'Tech' argued that 'the essence of bureaucratic control - the formalization, codification and enforcement of rules and regulations - does not change in principle Another smaller group of theorists have developed the theory of the Post-Bureaucratic Organization.

Charles Heckscher has developed an ideal type, the post-bureaucratic organization, in which decisions are based on dialogue and consensus rather than authority and command, the organization is a network rather than a hierarchy, open at the boundaries in direct contrast to culture management ; there is an emphasis on meta-decision-making rules rather than decision-making rules.

This sort of horizontal decision-making by consensus model is often used in housing cooperativesother cooperatives and when running a non-profit or community organization. It is used in order to encourage participation and help to empower people who normally experience oppression in groups.

Still other theorists are developing a resurgence of interest in complexity theory and organizationsand have focused on how simple structures can be used to engender organizational adaptations.

For instance, Miner et al. Their study makes links to simple structures and improviser learning. Other scholars such as Jan Rivkin and Sigglekow, [13] and Nelson Repenning [14] revive an older interest in how structure and strategy relate in dynamic environments.

Functional structure[ edit ] A functional organizational structure is a structure that consists of activities such as coordination, supervision and task allocation. The organizational structure determines how the organization performs or operates. The term organizational structure refers to how the people in an organization are grouped and to whom they report.

One traditional way of organizing people is by function. Some common functions within an organization include production, marketing, human resources, and accounting. This organizing of specialization leads to operational efficiency, where employees become specialists within their own realm of expertise.

On the other hand, the most typical problem with a functional organizational structure is that communication within the company can be rather rigid, making the organization slow and inflexible. Therefore, lateral communication between functions becomes very important, so that information is disseminated not only vertically, but also horizontally within the organization.

Communication in organizations with functional organizational structures can be rigid because of the standardized ways of operation and the high degree of formalization. As a whole, a functional organization is best suited as a producer of standardized goods and services at large volume and low cost.

Coordination and specialization of tasks are centralized in a functional structure, which makes producing a limited amount of products or services efficient and predictable. Moreover, efficiency can further be realized as functional organizations integrate their activities vertically so that products are sold and distributed quickly and at low cost.

Even though functional units often perform with a high level of efficiency, their level of cooperation with each other is sometimes compromised.

Bureaucratic organizations

Such groups may have difficulty working well with each other as they may be territorial and unwilling to cooperate. The occurrence of infighting among units may cause delays, reduced commitment due to competing interests, and wasted time, making projects fall behind schedule.In this lesson, we will discuss what a bureaucratic organization is.

We will also cover a few characteristics and examples of bureaucratic organizations, and then you can test your understanding. Environmental tragedies such as Chernobyl and the Exxon Valdez remind us that catastrophic accidents are always possible in a world full of hazardous technologies.

Yet, the apparently excellent safety record with nuclear weapons has led scholars, policy-makers, and the public alike to believe that nuclear arsenals can serve as a secure deterrent for the foreseeable future.

Organizational theory consists of approaches to organizational kaja-net.comzations are defined as social units of people that are structured and managed to meet a need, or to pursue collective goals. Theories of organizations include rational system perspective, division of labour, bureaucratic theory, and contingency theory.

In a rational organization system, there are two significant. A bureaucracy is any system of administration that uses policies, procedures and rules to function.

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Classic examples of bureaucracies include large corporations and government agencies. A bureaucracy has some key characteristics, including a clear power structure utilizing well-laid out rules and.

Feb 03,  · Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own. I write about organizational design, change and leadership. Some organizations function like Norman doors. They are designed for . Today, more Americans are working in large, bureaucratic organizations than ever before.

In , 47% of U.S. private sector employees worked in organizations with more than individuals on the.

Mintzberg's Organizational Configurations - Strategy at kaja-net.com