A portrayal of chine women in the joy luck club by amy tan

Being particularly famous for works of literature dedicated to mother-daughter ties, the writer gives an opportunity to plunge into the hardships appearing as the consequence of the generation gap. After getting acquainted with the novel it becomes clear that persistent tension between daughters and mothers inevitably has edifying character.

A portrayal of chine women in the joy luck club by amy tan

See also Amy Tan Criticism. It is regarded as a significant achievement in documenting the hardships and struggles of immigrants in America and in portraying the complexities of modern Chinese-American life. To escape war and poverty, the four mothers emigrate from China to America.

In the United States, they struggle to raise their American-born daughters in a vastly different culture. The novel opens with the death of Suyuan Woo, the matriarch of the Joy Luck Club, a social group of women who play the Chinese tile game mah-jongg and rely on each other for support. Suyuan founded the club in China and later reformed it in San Francisco.

Because Suyuan lost a husband and was forced to abandon her twin daughters during the Japanese invasion of China, she consistently pushed Jing-mei to succeed and make a better life for herself.

Waverly feels that Lindo takes too much credit for her success and, eventually, she accuses her mother of living vicariously through her. This confrontation causes each of them to question their own personal identity and the respect they have for each other.

After her husband leaves her, Ying-Ying is forced to move in with some of her poorer relatives. Her mother eventually commits suicide, giving An-mei a way to escape the life of a concubine.

The Joy Luck Club (film) - Wikipedia

Her aunties give Jing-mei the money she needs to travel to China, affirming the healing effect of storytelling and the very real—if elusive—bond between generations.

Major Themes The major theme of The Joy Luck Club concerns the nature of mother-daughter relationships, which are complicated not only by age difference, but by vastly different upbringings. Despite these fears, all four of the mothers attempt to give their children the best of both worlds.

The power and importance of storytelling is another significant theme in the novel.

A portrayal of chine women in the joy luck club by amy tan

One reason the mother-daughter relationships suffer is that neither generation speaks the language of the other—literally and metaphorically.

The mothers try to compensate for this difficulty in communication by relating information through stories. However, most of the stories only frustrate their daughters, who are at a loss to interpret what they really mean. Issues of self-worth and identity are also central to The Joy Luck Club.

All of the women both mothers and daughters wrestle with their past, their present, their ethnicity, their gender, and how they view themselves, as they struggle to construct their own life story and find a place for themselves in the world. Critical Reception Many critics have asserted that although the characters in The Joy Luck Club are Chinese-American, their struggles have a strong resonance for all people, especially women raised in America.

Reviewers have studied the novel from a variety of angles and have generally agreed that the book presents a poignant, insightful examination of not only the generation gap between mothers and daughters, but of the gaps between different cultures as well.

Critics have argued that the book works as an exploration of the issues that are vital to all immigrants in America—including ethnicity, gender, and personal identity.Amy Tan's “The Joy Luck Club” The “Joy Luck Club,” by Amy Tan, is a collection of short stories about the relationships between Chinese born mothers and their American born daughters.

The story called “Four Directions” is about a woman named Waverly Jong.

The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan

Amy Tan is the author of The Joy Luck Club, The Kitchen God’s Wife, The Hundred Secret Senses, and two children’s books, The Moon Lady and The Chinese Siamese Cat, which has been adapted as Sagwa, a PBS series for children. The Joy Luck Club, a novel by Amy Tan, is a reflection of a perennial problem related to a complex nature of the family inner relationship.

Being particularly famous for works of literature dedicated to mother-daughter ties, the writer gives an opportunity to plunge into the hardships appearing as the consequence of the generation gap. Critical Essays Tan's Women in The Joy Luck Club Bookmark this page Manage My Reading List The novel traces the fate of four mothers — Suyuan Woo, An-mei Hsu, Lindo Jong, and Ying-ying St.

Clair — and their four daughters — Jing-mei "June" Woo, Rose Hsu Jordan, Waverly Jong, and Lena St. Clair. Editions for The Joy Luck Club: (Paperback published in ), (Paperback published in ), (Kindle Edition published in ), 0. (Full name Amy Ruth Tan) American novelist, screenwriter, and children's writer.

The following entry presents criticism on Tan's The Joy Luck Club (). See also Amy Tan Criticism. The Joy Luck.

About The Joy Luck Club